INTERACTION DESIGN 310
Emily Carr University, Spring 2020, Section 2

Daniel Jolliffe, Yes, Yes and Yes (2019)

Instructor: Dr. Garnet Hertz
Lab tech: Bobbi Kozinuk (Wednesdays)
Course location/date: D1347 (WIP Lab), Mondays and Wednesdays 1-4pm
Spring 2020 office hours: Monday 4-5pm, Wednesday 4-5pm, Room C4246 (The Studio for Critical Making)
Email: garnethertz@gmail / Lab phone: 604-630-7427


NOTE THAT EVERYTHING HERE WILL FREQUENTLY CHANGE OVER THE SEMESTER
(Image above: Daniel Jolliffe, Yes, Yes and Yes (2019))
Last updated - 19 January 2020



DESCRIPTION

INTD 310 S002: Core Studio Interaction Design. This 6-credit core studio allows for an intensive project-based learning experience in interaction design. Students will be exposed to skills and theories that build on the knowledge from second year, expand their design capacities, and prepare them to work independently in fourth year.

Course content: Speculative and fictional approaches have long been implemented in human-computer interaction and design techniques through scenarios, prototypes, forecasting, and envisionments. In this course, you will design and build interface projects that are provocative, raise questions, and challenge how we think about the everyday world and technology. An emphasis of this course will be to develop unconventional physical/tactile interfaces using physical computing tools like the Arduino along with the rapid prototyping of real-world objects. During this course we will explore "post-optimal" design, or design that is concerned with more than just trying to make products easier to use, faster or more convenient. In the process, students will practice taking on the role of the designer as a cultural or social agitator.

Students in this course will combine critical thinking with DIY and design methods to explore 'critical making'. Students will implement and critique the practice of making through both literature and hands-on studio work. Foundational literature from the fields of design, informatics and the humanities will be explored to provide a context for the field, including reading on the topics of design fiction, speculative design, maker culture, values in design, ludic design and adversarial design. Hands-on studio work will include high and low-fidelity prototyping techniques including sketching, physical prototyping, electronics and physical computing. Students will envision and create devices and experiences that critically explore contemporary social and culturally relevant technological themes such as, agency and presence, community, privacy, intimacy, environments, health, education, economics and activism.

COURSE STRUCTURE

Project Grading

Grading in this class happens in many small assignments and activities, not as one big deliverable at the end of the semester: this studio course is situated under one semester long project done in 20 short phases. The key to performing well in this class is showing up, participating and continued effort over the entire semester.

Course Format

The course is divided between two weekly studios on Monday and Wednesday afternoons lasting 3 hours each. For the semester, we are scheduled to meet in room D1347 (The Wearable and Interactive Products Lab, or 'WIP Lab') with the amazing Bobbi Kozinuk. We may meet in alternate spaces for presentations as required. Most electronic-based work will be done in the WIP Lab. There is no textbook - all readings will be made available to you electronically. Students must come to class with at least one question pertaining to each required reading. Note that two special events in collaboration with Will Odom's SFU SIAT class are planned this semester with mandatory participation - they should be fun.

Process and Documentation

Students are expected to document their process throughout the course, including: class notes, ideation processes, observational studies, practicing of techniques, concept sketches, different drawing strategies (conceptual, pictorial, orthographic), fabrication research and details, user criteria, critical observations of designs you see or use, and examples of other designers work used as sources of information/inspiration. Digital documentation of final solutions should also be included. The process documentation is submitted at the end of the course and evaluated on the content as described.

Course Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course students are expected to demonstrate:

 

POLICIES

Participation and Discussion

Required readings are due before the start of class in which they are listed. Students are expected to have carefully read the readings before class. Students must come to class with at least one question about each required reading and be prepared to share it. These questions will form the backbone of our discussions. In addition to this, participation refers to:

Late Policy

Late assignments will be graded -10% per day late per assignment, prorated from time due in hour increments. In other words, an assignment submitted an hour late will be -0.42%, while an assignment submitted 50 hours late will be -20.8%.

Academic Integrity

Students are expected to be familiar with the details of the Emily Carr Academic Integrity Policy. In summary, any form of plagiarism (the intentional misrepresentation of someone else's work as your own) will result in you failing the course. This includes pasting in Wikipedia articles into assignments without citing it. Also note that you also cannot submit the same project to two courses.




WEEK 01a - January 6th 2020

Reimagining the Now
  1. Speculative Fiction Icebreaker: The date is January 6th 2050. Select a partner that you've never collaborated with before. Interview them about what they've done over the past 30 years, and write a short (30 second) bio for them. Also, make a 1 minute hand-drawn sketch of the person in 2050. Be prepared to introduce your partner by reading the bio and showing your sketch to the class (circa 2050). You will submit this for 2% of your final grade.
  2. Reimagining the Now: We are going to do a design activity that I've developed with Gillian Russell and Craig Badke - see details at http://conceptlab.com/reimaginingthenow. Let's use cardboard, hot glue guns, with miscellaneous parts/scrap materials.
  3. [BREAK]
  4. Course Overview and Discussion: Let's review the course. I am interested to hear what you would like to learn in the course, and am happy to change the course (to a certain extent) to fit your goals. Questions include:
    • What aspects of this course excite you or interest you the most? Why did you enroll in this class?
    • How technically familiar are you with physical computing, Arduino and electronics?
    • How much technical instruction on physical computing, Arduino and electronics do you want?
    • How interested are you in making prototypes actually work versus non-functional concept prototypes?
    • Are you interested in learning about CNC fabrication or 3D printing?
    • Some different course options include:
      • 4 Technical workshop assignments + 1 capstone project
      • 1 smaller project + 1 capstone project (w workshops interspersed)
      • 1 large, iterated and refined project (w workshops interspersed)
  5. Assignment for Next Class (Wednesday January 8th @ 1pm) - Prepare a 5-10 minute presentation on you and your work, providing a context for who you are, what work you've done in the past, what values are important to you, what concerns/worries you, and what your goals are for the future. Please include details regarding your technical knowledge of Arduino or Raspberry Pi - and your interest in continuing in this. Conclude the presentation with some thoughts on what you'd like to accomplish in this course. [WORTH 2% OF FINAL GRADE.]


  6. Hi everybody,

    It was great to meet all of you today - thanks for your effort in the 2050 Biographies you prepared and presented. The Reimagining the Now design sketches you made were also fun. We survived! At the end of class I outlined the assignment for Wednesday. Here's the blurb posted online (at http://conceptlab.com/teaching/intd310/):

    "Assignment for Next Class (Wednesday January 8th @ 1pm) - Prepare a 5-10 minute presentation on you and your work, providing a context for who you are, what work you've done in the past, what values are important to you, what concerns/worries you, and what your goals are for the future. Conclude the presentation with some thoughts on what you'd like to accomplish in this course. [WORTH 2% OF FINAL GRADE.]"

    In other words, on Wednesday I'd like to learn more about you and your work. This helps me flex the course around your interests, talents, or working on addressing gaps in knowledge.

    In particular, I'm interested in seeing a wide survey of the design work that you've done. Cram as many images as possible of your design work and go quickly through them. As an idea, just showing a bunch of images for ~10 seconds each while only giving a few verbal notes about the projects is fine for this presentation. If it is important to you, you can also show images of other objects that you've made like artwork, clothing, craft, or other things/accomplishments that are important to you. Give a 60 second highlight of one particular project that you've done that you're the proudest of. I'd also like to see your attempts at doing physical computing (especially Arduino) work, and your honest opinion about what you loved and/or hated about that process.

    I also want to hear from you what you want to be taught. Here's a menu (more or less) of some of the more skill-oriented items that I can offer - and as a forewarning I've gone a bit overboard with this. These items could be done as short workshops, breakout/affinity groups, or larger themes. Take note if some of the following items pique your interests:

    - Making a book together - Past books I've made include http://disobedientelectronics.com, http://conceptlab.com/criticalmaking/, http://conceptlab.com/problems/, https://vimeo.com/84977518 and others. I would oversee print production on a Risograph press. Students get free copies. We mail free copies to 100 of the world's most interesting people/libraries/places.

    - Topic: What is HCI? Human computer interaction (HCI) researches the design and use of computer technology, focused on the interfaces between people (users) and computers. An introduction to the field would be provided, focusing on recent research published at ACM CHI, Designing Interative Systems (DIS) and Ubicomp conferences. Priority given to speculative/critical design research.

    - Research through Design (RtD). Read stuff like https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/book/the-encyclopedia-of-human-computer-interaction-2nd-ed/research-through-design and tilt our project production schedule to a RtD-style methodology.

    - Computer programming - programmatic thinking, state machine design, pseudocode, how to code/compile/debug, working with data, how programming languages differ, IDEs, code development exercises in Processing (Java), tutorials on programming visual effects, physics & particle systems and emergent behaviours using Shiffman's https://natureofcode.com/.

    - CNC fabrication & 3D printing. Students would actually learn the basics of operating a CNC router, rudimentary CAM and toolpaths, laser cutting, vinyl cutter/plotter, 3D printing, custom devices.

    - Embedded computer systems and "smart object" development. What is the Internet of Things? Domestic computing.

    - Gizmos, Gadgets, Robotics & Mechanisms. Physical linkages, tactile interfaces, buttons, springs, rubber bands, paper clips, wheels, knobs, levers, traps, Rube Goldbergism, kludges, DIY, https://www.reddit.com/r/thereifixedit/, jugaad, frugal innovation.

    - Making Your Experimental UX Project into a Printed Circuit Board.

    - Consumer electronic product design and development. Tactile interface design.

    - How to get experimental UX design work into exhibitions, galleries, museums, and festivals. How to travel the world for free doing odd non-commercial design work or artsy UX. (Hint: it's not easy.)

    - The Politics & Impact of Design and UX.

    - Artistic UX - The Crossovers Between Experimental UX & Media Arts.

    - Designing Alien UX - Have Noel Rubin (https://www.instagram.com/teknoelogy/ and https://www.fastcompany.com/3025661/how-a-kid-grew-up-to-design-the-alien-uis-of-star-wars) come into class and talk about how he designed alien UX for George Lucas in Star Wars.

    - Heavy Metal Madness - Learn How to Solder Metal, Weld Metal, Melt and Cast Metal while listening to the very best in heavy metal music. (Very much subject to facility availability. Music available whenever.)

    - Bad Design Challenge - Make the Absolute Worst User Interface Olympics.

    - Stop Just Trying to Make All Your Stuff Look Cool. Your Vision of the Future is Boring. There is No Such Thing as Universally Intuitive Design. Trying to Make Things Seamless is Often a Bad Idea. Pay Attention to the Complexity and Weirdness of Life if You Want to Make Interesting Design.

    - Project Propaganda - How to Make Your Projects Look Amazing.

    - A Century of Artistic Interfaces - How Artists, Builders and Designers have made artistic technological devices over the past hundred years.

    - How to Come Up with Interesting Design Ideas. Hits, memes, marketing, fame, viraility and brainmagnets. Design concepts that initially strike a chord with a wide audience, but then continue far past a one-liner tagline or gag: they drill down with a substantial amount of intelligent research and design.

    - Designing with Paper: Making cardboard/chipboard tactile interfaces, paper screen UX, other control panel and UX prototypes made from paper, folding, specialized cutting tools and assembly, Pepakura. Folding Techniques for Designers (Paul Jackson).

    - Physical computing crash-course. Learn how to design, program, build, wire up, test, deploy your own custom device with an emphasis on UX-style haptic buttons, knobs, sliders, rocker switches, small displays and dials. See https://www.danieljolliffe.ca/cp/cp.htm or https://ewajustka.tumblr.com/ for ideas.
    - How to Build an Interactive Environment. Architectural-scale design, lights, motion, sensors, outputs, sound, DMX, projection mapping concepts, science-center-ish interfaces, VJ, laser projection, LED boards, Makey Makey, Kinect. Maybe have a party or showcase at the end of the semester as a group capstone.

    It's going to take forever on Wednesday afternoon if we're all talking about the points above - so for your 5-10 minute presentation, try to keep your comments on the course direction short. For example, "I hated Raspberry Pi, and I am really interested in academic and industry research in HCI, plus I'd like to hear the Star Wars guy talk" is decent enough for me to note your specific course interests. We'll take time during the second half of class on Wednesday to talk as a group about what we most want to learn. We'll strive to have a course map sketched out by the end of the class Wednesday by 3:50pm (fingers crossed).

    See you Wednesday, and please forward this to those in the process of registering for this course (especially Tien - I don't have his email) or others that might want to transfer.

    Thanks,
    Garnet

    --
    Dr. Garnet Hertz
    Canada Research Chair in Design and Media Arts
    Emily Carr University of Art and Design
    520 East 1st Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 0H2



WEEK 01b - January 8th 2020

Fill-in-the-Blanks Project Form
  1. Self-Introduction Presentations: 5-10 minute presentations per person.
  2. [BREAK]
  3. FILL-IN-THE-BLANKS PROJECT & IKIGAI IN-CLASS ACTIVITY: Complete the "Critical Making Fill-in-the-Blanks Project Form", and fill in the "Ikigai" quadrant on the back of the page, outlining what you 1. Are good at, 2. What you love, 3. What the world needs, 4. What you can be paid for.
  4. Assignment for Next Class (Monday) - Prepare four one-page annotated design sketches using the prompts below.
    1. Speculative Design / Design Fiction: Like science fiction, an object can point to a speculative future that only partially resembles the present day. How can a designed object act as a cautionary tale about what the future might hold? In what ways might the future be distopic, and what devices might we need in it? If specific variables change and drastically alter the world (global warming, oil, water, population) what would we need to survive? What would present-day things be like if the past was considerably different (like steampunk)?
    2. Ludic Design: How can an object be built to be playful, ambiguous, or confusing? How can a sense of wonder or mystery in the world be enhanced?
    3. Critical Design: How can an electronic object be built to critique mass-market electronic products? How can an object increase mindfulness or existential awareness in the user? What happens when an object is designed that makes the user feel uneasy?
    4. Adversarial Design / Tactical Media / Hack: How can a project be built to be highlight the unfair use of power? What marginalized individuals, groups or opinions can be highlighted in a clever way? Who is voiceless, and how can you amplify their voice? How can existing systems be modified, hacked or misused to reveal how they are biased? What happens when an object is built to communicate an argument in an interesting way?
    5. Disobedient Objects: Most objects are designed to do exactly as they are told. What would happen if objects could do as they pleased? What would they want? What would they dream about? What would they do for work, fun, or entertainment?
    6. Unconventional Users: Most objects are built to be used by humans with ten fingers, two hands, two legs, two eyes and a 'standard' body. How would objects be designed if they were used by individuals without these types of bodies or senses? How would objects be redesigned if they did not have binary assumptions around gender? What would an object be designed like if it was built for a non-human to use?
    7. Slow Interaction: Most products are designed to be easy to use, quick, and efficient. How can systems be improved by slowing them down? How can focus be increased? How can interactions be made more meaningful?
    8. Bespokeness: How would an object be redesigned if it was highly customized for one particular person? (Do not build it for yourself: customize it for another person at least 10 years older or younger than you.)
    9. Reflective Design: How can an object expose the unconscious adoption of values within conventional technological products or culture? How can you highlight the biased assumptions built into the artifacts around us? What values are taken for granted? Can you make something that makes the invisible into something visible?
    10. Make an App-Thing: If an app would exist as a physical thing, what would it be like? What would it look like and how would it work? Alternately, how could a machine be built to use one specific app on your phone, like a piece of meat attached to a spinning shaft continually swipes Tinder?
    11. OK Boomer: Thoughtfully make an interactive object that highlights unique economic/social/etc issues that millennials face. Make the device legible and useable to boomers in an interesting way.
  5. Email sent out Friday January 10th:

    Hi folks,

    After hearing your presentations, talking to some of you one-on-one, and giving it some thought, I'm going to propose that the semester ahead follows this structure:

    1. During the next three weeks, let's focus on generating a lot of project sketches, maquettes, and ideas. I agree with the feedback that a lot of courses slam you into committing to a concept right away. Instead, I'd like to focus on how to come up with innovative project concepts that have both wide appeal (virality) and deep insight (intelligence) - that combination is a path to creating awe-inspiring design work. This will include some reading related to current HCI research, me showing examples, buiding rapid prototype concepts, and workshopping ideas and interfaces. 

    2. I think that the book idea is 100% a go. I think it's a good way to disseminate our work in a novel (and durable) way that will have significant payoff in the future. 

    3. Making fully functional custom hardware projects (Arduino or RPi) can be super damn hard - in a course, it's a massive struggle to make something actually function like a piece of consumer electronics. If the thing has any chance of working, it is likely going to look like crap. Code examples are crashed through in a panic while quickly sinking and trying to keep your head above water. It's not fun. On the other hand, actually knowing how to code is going to be a huge asset to you when you hit the job market. To help resolve these two things, I think the following approach would be best for our group: teach a systematic step-by-step introduction to programming using Arduino. The focus would be on trying to gain an intuitive knowledge of how programming works in general, with skills that are transferrable to other programming languages and environments. Another way to think of this is for me (and Bobbi) to teach you the core skills in programming so that it is way easier for you to teach yourself to code in any language. Ardino is going to be useful if you go into exhibition design or hardware stuff, but the real moneymaker is going to be if you know enough coding concepts that can teach yourself Ruby on Rails, Python, Java, C++ or whatever else comes your way.

    4. Functional hardware is hard to make - everything from the code, the soldering, the knobs/buttons, the enclosure & mechanisms can be a massive pain. I think a decent goal instead of trying to do =all= of this is to focus on the front-end UX: the enclosure, the knobs, buttons, screens, lights. In other words, focus on building stuff that looks good, but only works good enough to shoot a video or do a "smoke and mirrors" demo. One way to think of this is to build props/wireframes/devices that are "Kickstarter video" ready. This massively reduces complexity. In practical terms, this means more attention paid to front-end things you can see as opposed to back-end stuff like networking, databases, complex logic or code stability/ruggedness.

    5. Let's talk about this on Monday, but I think I'll briefly teach about 3D printing. 3D printing is about 10x easier to do than CNC fabrication (especially if you're doing the CNC cutting yourself) - and it is something that for about $350 you can get a decent 3D printer on your own at a later date and do it on your own for fun or for work. I'm happy to do CNC with some people individually if their projects warrant it, but at this point I don't think it's useful for me to take everyone through the CNC journey.

    6. We will do something for sure with Will Odom's class at SFU. More on Odom can be found at http://willodom.com/ and the lab he's in is http://eds.siat.sfu.ca/. We'll for sure have at least one event where we get together - and maybe have Will come for a talk/crit in our class (and vice versa with just me going to SFU and doing a talk/crit with that group).

    If you're still working on the 4 annotated sketches that are due on Monday, hopefully the notes outlined above will help guide you.

    Thanks, and see you Monday,

    Garnet
     



WEEK 02a - January 13th 2020

Interaction Design 310: Week 02a - An Introduction to Critical Design by Garnet Hertz
  1. Hertz Presentation: What is Critical Design? - Lecture Slides (114 MB PDF)
  2. [BREAK]
  3. Assignment Due Today - Four one-page annotated design sketches.
    • Today's Charette Activity: Pair up with a classmate and each present your 4 project sketches to the other person. Spend 10 minutes giving each other critique on all of the projects, writing your feedback on the sketch sheets. After 10 minutes, partner up with a new person and repeat.
  4. Readings Due Next Class - Come to next class (Wednesday January 15th) with either one 5 minute project sketch or one direct question related to each of the following readings. Use 4 physical pieces of paper, placing either your question or your sketch on a single piece - and please indicate on the paper the your name and the reading you are responding to. Be prepared to show and share your questions/sketches with the class.:
    • Introducing Adversarial Design (Carl DiSalvo) in Critical Making: Manifestos, Garnet Hertz (ed.) Telharmonium, 2012.
    • Critical Design FAQ (Anthony Dunne & Fiona Raby) 2007.
    • The Critical Engineering Manifesto (Oliver, Savicic, Vasiliev) 2011.
    • Pick one project from Disobedient Electronics (Hertz, 2016) that most closely aligns with your interests or that you have a strong reaction to (positive or negative). Be prepared to tell the class (in 2 minutes) why you picked the project. It may help to think about what audiences you think the project was designed for, and what technical/fabrication tools were used in building the project.



WEEK 02b - January 15th 2020

Snow in Vancouver January 15th 2020 - Photo by CBC BC https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/metro-vancouver-snow-jan-15-1.5427351
  1. Class cancelled - Emily Carr campus closed due to snow. See https://bc.ctvnews.ca/emily-carr-university-to-remain-closed-until-oct-15-1.4630201 for details. Items slated for today will take place during the next class on Monday January 20th 2020.



WEEK 03a - January 20th 2020

  1. Welcome Video - The 79 Percent Work Clock (2016) [2 minutes: start class at 1:03pm, 1:03-1:05]
  2. Course Roadmap Discussion [10 minutes, 1:05-1:15]
    WEEKDATEACTIVITY
    Week 01Jan 06/08Design Charettes, Reading, Project Brainstorm Sketches
    Week 02Jan 13/14What is Critical Design, Project Brainstorm Sketches, Reading
    Week 03Jan 21/23WE ARE CURRENTLY HERE - Project Brainstorm Sketches, Reading, Programmatic Thinking (Logic Diagrams, Program Organization)
    Week 04Jan 27/29More Project Brainstorm Sketches, Reading, Programmatic Thinking (Writing Pseudocode, Arduino Desktop IDE)
    Week 05Feb 03/05Guest Speaker, Even More Project Brainstorming, Rapid Prototyping (cardboard), Reading, Sensors / Switches
    Week 06Feb 10/12Selection of Project, 3D Printing Tutorial, Arduino Syntax, Installing Libraries
    Week 07Feb 17/19Reading Week - No Class (Fabrication and Coding)
    Week 08Feb 24/26Semifunctional Cardboard Project Due, Peer Reviews, Actuators / Displays / Creative Output
    Week 09Mar 02/04Continue Fabricating Project or Ditch it and Pick a New One
    Week 10Mar 09/11Finishing Techniques, Code Stability, Drafting a Project Statement
    Week 11Mar 16/18Functional Project Due, Peer Reviews
    Week 12Mar 23/25Refinements, Documentation, Project Statements
    Week 13 Mar 30/01Documentation Due, Project Statements Due, Book Layout Due
    Week 14Apr 06/08Book Production (print, fold, bind, trim, ship)
    TBDTBDParty/Event (Date to be determined, possibly April 08)
  3. Readings Due Today - Bring out either one 5 minute project sketch or one direct question related to each of the following readings. Ensure that you have used 4 physical pieces of paper, placing either your question or your sketch on a single piece - and please indicate on the paper the your name and the reading you are responding to. Be prepared to show and share your questions/sketches with the class today:
    • First, let's discuss Introducing Adversarial Design (Carl DiSalvo) [10 minutes, 1:15-1:25]
      Adversarial Design - Photo by Matt Kenyon
    • Second, let's discuss Critical Design FAQ (Anthony Dunne & Fiona Raby) 2007. [10 minutes, 1:25-1:35]
    • Thirdly, let's discuss The Critical Engineering Manifesto (Oliver, Savicic, Vasiliev) 2011. [10 minutes, 1:35-1:45]
    • Lastly, let's hear which project from Disobedient Electronics (Hertz, 2016) that you picked. The assignment was that you were to pick a project that most closely aligns with your interests or that you have a strong reaction to (positive or negative). Tell the class (in 2 minutes) why you picked the project. It may help to think about what audiences you think the project was designed for, and what technical/fabrication tools were used in building the project. [30 minutes, 1:45-2:15]
  4. BREAK [15 minutes, 2:15-2:30]
    How to Play Pictionary
  5. Let's start our tutorials on programming, beginning with the idea of sketching the logic of a program. We will use a simplified version of a state machine diagram. [30 minutes, 2:30-3:00]
  6. Activity: Let's try to make a simplified logic diagram (or "directed graph") of Phone Safe 2.1 - here's a video of it in operation. [30 minutes, 3:00-3:30]
    • Let's draw circles for the states, and labelled arrows for the inputs/transitions.
    • For the time being, the most important thing to remember is that diagramming out a flowchart or state machine diagram of how you want a thing/system to work is a good step to help you understand how to code.
    • For our purposes today, we will only be doing simple states (circles) with transitions (arrows) - also called a 'directed graph'. We will not be using truth/state tables, complex input-output, flow chart symbols, Mealy machines, etc.
  7. QUESTIONS [5 minutes, 3:30-3:35]
  8. IKIGAI ACTIVITY [10 minutes, 3:35-3:45]
    • WHITEBOARD DISCUSSION: What does the world need? What do you hate, or what really bothers you? What issues are important to you?
      Ikigai quadrant Venn diagram
  9. Assignment due for next class [15 minutes, 3:45-3:50]
    1. First, watch this video (especially the first 6 minutes):
    2. Next, spend 15 minutes filling out the pink Ikigai sheet with written details about: A. what you are good at, B. what you love, C. what the world needs, and D. what you can be paid for.
    3. Lastly, prepare one annotated project sketch per quadrant, spending 15 minutes on each sketch. Complete 4 sketches. Please use single sheets of 8.5" x 11" (letter) paper and include the date and your full name. Your sketches should incorporate some aspect of physical computing; in other words the sketches should involve some form of computer-based system in some physical shape. (Optional: If desired, you can use categories from January 8th outlined above - Speculative Design / Design Fiction, Ludic Design, Critical Design, etc. - to help guide your designs.)
    4. Estimated time to complete assignment: 1.5 hours - WORTH 2% OF FINAL GRADE. (Grading Rubric: Do 4 sketches of any quality: C. Do 4 sketches of decent quality: B. Do 4 sketches of good quality w attention to detail: A. Using 4 pieces of physical paper and including name and date: +1 lettergrade.

WEEK 03b - January 22nd 2020

  1. WELCOME VIDEO - Rafael Lozano-Hemmer [5 minutes - 1:05-1:10]
  2. IKIGAIFEST - It's going to be a party! (official soundtrack) [55 minutes total - 1:10-2:15]
    Ikigaifest with CEOwen
    IKIGAIFEST SHARING - You've filled out the pink Ikigai sheet with written details about: A. what you are good at, B. what you love, C. what the world needs, and D. what you can be paid for. We also have completed one annotated project sketch per quadrant. Let's do mini-presentations where each person takes 5 minutes to show their diagrams and their 4 project sketches at the front of the class. Let's discuss and give feedback to each person.
  3. DISCUSSION - What does the world really need?
  4. BREAK [15 minutes - 2:15-2:30pm]
  5. TECH WORKSHOP / DISCUSSION: [60 minutes - 2:30-3:30pm]
    • What can an Arduino do and not do?
    • What is a computer program?
    • How is code structured?
  6. ASSIGNMENT: [10 minutes - 3:30-3:50pm]
    Prepare two (2) detailed project proposals that describe final term projects that you might do. USE THE RUBRIC BELOW INITIALLY FROM JANUARY 8th. You can reuse the ideas from sketches you've already done in the class, but please revise them. Include a: 1. an annotated sketch, 2. a short description of what the project would be trying to do, and 3. an attempt at a state machine diagram of how it would work. TAKE ONE HOUR PER SKETCH/PROJECT: 2 HOURS TOTAL
    1. Speculative Design / Design Fiction: Like science fiction, an object can point to a speculative future that only partially resembles the present day. How can a designed object act as a cautionary tale about what the future might hold? In what ways might the future be distopic, and what devices might we need in it? If specific variables change and drastically alter the world (global warming, oil, water, population) what would we need to survive? What would present-day things be like if the past was considerably different (like steampunk)?
    2. Ludic Design: How can an object be built to be playful, ambiguous, or confusing? How can a sense of wonder or mystery in the world be enhanced?
    3. Critical Design: How can an electronic object be built to critique mass-market electronic products? How can an object increase mindfulness or existential awareness in the user? What happens when an object is designed that makes the user feel uneasy?
    4. Adversarial Design / Tactical Media / Hack: How can a project be built to be highlight the unfair use of power? What marginalized individuals, groups or opinions can be highlighted in a clever way? Who is voiceless, and how can you amplify their voice? How can existing systems be modified, hacked or misused to reveal how they are biased? What happens when an object is built to communicate an argument in an interesting way?
    5. Disobedient Objects: Most objects are designed to do exactly as they are told. What would happen if objects could do as they pleased? What would they want? What would they dream about? What would they do for work, fun, or entertainment?
    6. Unconventional Users: Most objects are built to be used by humans with ten fingers, two hands, two legs, two eyes and a 'standard' body. How would objects be designed if they were used by individuals without these types of bodies or senses? How would objects be redesigned if they did not have binary assumptions around gender? What would an object be designed like if it was built for a non-human to use?
    7. Slow Interaction: Most products are designed to be easy to use, quick, and efficient. How can systems be improved by slowing them down? How can focus be increased? How can interactions be made more meaningful?
    8. Bespokeness: How would an object be redesigned if it was highly customized for one particular person? (Do not build it for yourself: customize it for another person at least 10 years older or younger than you.)
    9. Reflective Design: How can an object expose the unconscious adoption of values within conventional technological products or culture? How can you highlight the biased assumptions built into the artifacts around us? What values are taken for granted? Can you make something that makes the invisible into something visible?
    10. Make an App-Thing: If an app would exist as a physical thing, what would it be like? What would it look like and how would it work? Alternately, how could a machine be built to use one specific app on your phone, like a piece of meat attached to a spinning shaft continually swipes Tinder?
    11. OK Boomer: Thoughtfully make an interactive object that highlights unique economic/social/etc issues that millennials face. Make the device legible and useable to boomers in an interesting way.
  7. NEXT CLASS: BRING LAPTOPS, ARDUINOS, and ALL OF YOUR PAST SKETCHES TO SUBMIT

WEEK 04a - January 27th 2020

  1. WELCOME KEYNOTE - Interaction Design 310: WEEK 04a - Some detailed ikigai sketch feedback [30 minutes - 1:05-1:35]
  2. TODAY'S SKETCHES - [40 minutes - 1:35-2:15] - Let's put them on whiteboard, each person presents on their sketches (4 mins max each person).
  3. [BREAK] - [15 minutes - 2:15-2:30]
  4. LET'S REVIEW A FEW BASICS - [10 minutes - 2:30-2:40] - How a breadboard works. See https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/how-to-use-a-breadboard for details if this is new to you.
  5. LET'S REVIEW A FEW BASICS - [10 minutes - 2:40-2:50] - How to use a multimeter (also called a voltmeter) to test resistors. See https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/how-to-use-a-multimeter/measuring-resistance for a good overview
  6. ACTIVITY [50 minutes - 2:50-3:40] : Work on your projects, talk to classmates to see if you want to consolidate and work on a group project. Try to form some affinity groups around topics or technologies. Start on your assignment for next class (see below) - a 5 minute PowerPoint presentation on what project you propose to do in this course.
  7. ACTIVITY (Simultaneously happening): Hertz talk to each student one-on-one about their projects, 5 minutes each. [50 minutes - 2:50-3:40]
  8. ASSIGNMENT FOR NEXT CLASS [10 minutes - 3:40-3:50] : Finalize what you are going to attempt for a project for the term. It is okay if this evolves over the semester. Ambitious team projects are welcomed. Prepare a 5 minute visual PowerPoint presentation (which will be submitted as a PDF) that outlines in more detail how you plan on executing your project. This should include a shopping list of what supplies and parts you think you might need to pull this off. If it is a team project, determine who will be on the project and specific details about what each person will be doing. It is highly suggested that you include a proposed timeline for your project. If helpful, you can include a SWOT Analysis, although this is optional. [2 HOURS WORK EACH PERSON, worth 4% of final grade]
  9. BONUS POINT ASSIGNMENT FOR NEXT CLASS: Make an attempt to complete https://www.programmingelectronics.com/tutorial-17-using-a-button-old-version/ (+1% FINAL GRADE Bonus Points if you complete this before class and send me an emailed photo of it working). We will thoroughly review this sketch during next class.
  10. INVITE: I have a couple pieces in the faculty show on the 2nd floor opening on Thursday @ 4pm - you're welcome to come if you like. (Not graded, but apparently there are free refreshments.)

Week 04b - January 29th 2020

  1. OPENING 10-SECOND STAND-UP COMEDY ROUTINE: I thought I saw one of you a couple days ago walking along the street, but it wasn't him. Colby?
  2. PRESENTATIONS! [5 minutes each - 1:05-2:00] : Present a 5 minute visual PowerPoint presentation (which will be submitted as a PDF emailed to garnethertz@gmail.com) that outlines in more detail how you plan on executing your project. This should include a shopping list of what supplies and parts you think you might need to pull this off. If it is a team project, determine who will be on the project and specific details about what each person will be doing. It is highly suggested that you include a proposed timeline for your project. If helpful, you can include a SWOT Analysis, although this is optional. [2 HOURS WORK EACH PERSON, worth 4% of final grade - email PDF today before 4pm to garnethertz@gmail.com]
  3. ARDUINO CODING MINI-TUTORIAL: [15 minutes - 2:00-2:15] Let's all walk-through and complete https://www.programmingelectronics.com/tutorial-17-using-a-button-old-version/ - this is a basic Arduino sketch that provides several of the basics
  4. [BREAK] [15 minutes - 2:15-2:30] Meet back at after the break in my studio - C4246 at 2:30pm sharp!
  5. FIELD TRIP [5 minutes - 2:30-2:35] The Studio for Critical Making, Room C4246. We will be gone from here by 2:35 and will be returning back to the classroom (WIP Lab).
  6. 5 MINUTES ON DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR 3D PRINTING vs CNC [5 minutes - 2:40-2:45]
  7. SOLDERING DEMO: [15 minutes - 3:20-3:35] Soldering is easy! (Guide by Mitch Altman)
  8. CARDBOARD + ARDUINO BUTTONLIGHT + SOLDERING CHALLENGE: Attempt to make a 'functioning' cardboard prototype of your project concept, using the Button Arduino sketch. Practice your soldering skills by soldering wires (approximately 30 cm in length) to each leg of the LED and the button.
  9. ASSIGNMENT: Due Monday, worth 2% of final grade.
    1. Solder wires (red for positive, black for negative) of about 30 cm in length to your LEDs. Add shrink wrap to your soldered connections.
    2. Solder wires (any color) of about 30 cm in length to a button.
    3. Come to class on Monday and be prepared to do one-on-one desk crits with Amelia Guimarin and Noel Rubin. The more you bring/present, the better quality feedback you'll get.
  10. INVITE: I have a couple pieces in the faculty show on the 2nd floor opening on Thursday @ 4pm - you're welcome to come if you like. (Not graded, but apparently there is unlimited free refreshments.)

Week 05a - February 3rd 2020

  1. HERTZ GONE: Hertz is currently away presenting at the Disruptive Design and Digital Fabrication Symposium at York University's School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design.
  2. OVERVIEW: Today's guest instructors are Amelia Guimarin and Noel Rubin. Rubin will start with a 20 minute overview of his interaction design work, then both Guimarin and Rubin will do short desk crits giving feedback on each of your projects. While desk crits are in progress, attempt to make a cardboard model of your project that uses the Button circuit (above) with the cardboard to approximate your system.
  3. GUIMARIN ATTENDANCE: Amelia Guimarin takes attendance. While taking attendance, have each person show their soldered LED and button that was due today (assignment outlined above). The soldered connections should have shrinkwrap.
  4. NOEL RUBIN PRESENTATION: Noel Rubin gives a 20 minute overview of his interaction design work.
  5. DESIGN CHARETTE: Make a cardboard model of your proposed term project. This can be full size (preferred) or a scale model. Build the maquette out of cardboard and hot glue. You may use other materials if you like. Mount the Button circuit inside of the device, and use the circuit as a stand-in for your final circuit. Attempt to implement your button in a way that illustrates how users will interact with your project. The goal of this exercise is to think about the physical form and dimensions of your system.
  6. DESK CRITS: Running simultaneously with the design charette (above), both Amelia Guimarin and Noel Rubin will meet with each student to give them feedback on your project. The more you bring/present about your project, the better quality feedback you'll get.
  7. [15 MINUTE BREAK AT SOME POINT]
  8. DUE NEXT CLASS: Complete your cardboard model of your proposed term project. This can be full size (preferred) or a scale model. Build the maquette out of cardboard and hot glue. You may use other materials if you like. Mount the Button circuit inside of the device, and use the circuit as a stand-in for your final circuit. If needed, the button wire length and button type can be modified. Attempt to implement your button in a way that illustrates how users will interact with your project. The goal of this exercise is to think about the physical form and dimensions of your system. You may make more than one model if you like. SPEND UP TO 2 HOURS TOTAL ON THIS ASSIGNMENT. WORTH 3% of FINAL GRADE. Please bring this completed model on Wednesday.

Week 05b - February 5rd 2020

  1. HERTZ BACK: I was away presenting at the Disruptive Design and Digital Fabrication Symposium at York University's School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design.
    • Photos and press coverage. (Provide overview of work shown at conference/exhibition.)
    • Tips on travelling with projects: everything that can go wrong will go wrong.
    • The economics of travelling with projects: honoraria, fees, expenses.
  2. REVIEW: How did Monday go with Amelia Guimarin and Noel Rubin?
  3. PRESENTATION OF MODELS: Let's share our cardboard models of our proposed term projects. Were you able to implement your button in a way that illustrates how users will interact with your project? How are you thinking about the physical form and dimensions of your system? You may make more than one model if you like. (2 HOURS / WORTH 3% of FINAL GRADE).
  4. [15 MINUTE BREAK AT SOME POINT]
  5. CODE EXAMPLE 1: http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Fade

    Fade: This example shows how to fade an LED on pin 9 using the analogWrite() function.
    It is also a good example to start to understand the main program loop (void loop() {}) and variables: pay special attention to the brightness and fadeAmount variables, and especially this:
    if (brightness <= 0 || brightness >= 255) {
    fadeAmount = -fadeAmount;
    }
  6. CODE EXAMPLE 2: http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/IfStatement

    Conditionals - If statement

    This example demonstrates the use of if() statements.
    It reads the state of a potentiometer (an analog input) and turns on an LED only if the potentiometer goes above a certain threshold level. It prints the analog value regardless of the level.

    The circuit:
    - potentiometer
    Center pin of the potentiometer goes to analog pin 0.
    Side pins of the potentiometer go to +5V and ground.
    - LED connected from digital pin 13 to ground

    - Note: On most Arduino boards, there is already an LED on the board connected
    to pin 13, so you don't need any extra components for this example.
  7. DESK CRITS: Hertz will meet with students to give them feedback on their projects. The more you bring/present about your project, the better quality feedback you'll get.
  8. DUE MONDAY: Choose one subcomponent (physical part, circuit, some code, anything) of your final term project and complete it for Monday's class. Spend more than 90 minutes on this.
  9. EMAIL SENT FEB 6th 2020:

    Hi everybody,

    One thing that has repeatedly come up in discussing people's projects one-on-one with them is the idea of writing up a detailed persona for your project. In other words, pretend as if your project had a personality: is it curious, slow-moving and tender, aggressive, paranoid, neurotic, needy, or a diva?

    Taking a human-like approach to thinking of your project is one way to help make something truly interesting and innovative. If you think about it, many, many consumer projects are simply servants-in-waiting without much personality. Siri, for example is very bland. One way to think of the role of smaller-scale designers (startups, R&D labs, artsy types, design innovators) is to hit outside of the ordinary and "average" kind of approach that if it was a pizza would be a bland cheese-and-sauce general purpose variety thing.

    I really think that this also has to do with similar concerns with inclusivity in design - it's not just wierdo stuff in a gallery. Adding more personality and uniqueness to your work is a similar move to thinking about users in a broader and expanded sense. Both involve getting outside of yourself and thinking about the world from different perspectives. It's partially about learning to be empathetic.

    So, if you're stuck on figuring out how your projects should actually work, draw up a personality profile (persona) and a backstory around your project as if it was a person or an animal. I'll use Brandon's and Dianne's projects as examples:

    FISH TANK THAT DUMPS WATER AS AN ALARM
    Questions to answer:
    - Why does it want to dump the water? What motivates it?
    - Why does it care if the person sleeps in or not?
    - What does it think of fish? Does it care about them? Love them? Hate them? Want to kill them? Why?

    HEARTBEAT MUSIC PLAYER
    Questions to answer:
    - Does it like when people stick fingers into it? Does it please it? Annoy it?
    - Is it hungry for fingers? Does it like the taste of fingers?
    - What is the device's relationship to music? Why music? What kind of music does it like? Why?

    Figuring out these details - to actually enter the mindset of the object - is a key to making a project that people percieve as magical. It's also essential to make complex and emergent intelligent behaviour (AKA "personality") in an interactive system. If you want to learn more about how to make very complex behaviours using simple programming, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-fxij3zM7g about Braitenburg Vehicles - truly understanding this will (hopefully) blow your mind in terms of easily making complex behaviour. The video also walks through an Arduino code example. This principle of giving things personalities (through logic rules) can be applied to visual drawings as well to make incredilby complex things: https://reas.com/compendium_lecture/ is an example.

    Hopefully this is helpful. Let's continue the discussion on Monday.

    I also encourage you to come visit me in the gallery if you'd like to chat about your projects.

    Thanks,
    Garnet

Week 06a - Monday February 10th 2020

  1. PROJECTFEST TODAY!
  2. DUE TODAY: Show one subcomponent (physical part, circuit, some code, anything) of your final term project and complete it for Monday's class. Spend more than 90 minutes on this.
  3. ASSIGNMENT: Make a 1. Personality profile for your project, 2. Create a Bill of Materials ("BOM") with specific parts, part numbers, suppliers, cost, ordering considerations (time). Have both of these approved by Hertz (and optionally Kozinuk).
  4. PROJECTFEST: Work on your projects today.





Garnet Hertz, 2020
http://www.conceptlab.com/teaching
http://www.conceptlab.com/